Back

Pinot Blanc - Roter Traminer

Pinot Blanc - Roter Traminer

Pinot Blanc, Weißburgunder, Fehér Burgundi, Pinot Branco, Pinot Bianco – many names for the same grape depending on where you find it.
I would advise anyone who wants to delve deeply into the origins of grapes to look at ‘Wine Grapes’ by Jancis Robinson et al., the most authoritative tome on the subject. It did help my spinning head a little, but not much, as the Traminer/Savagnin family is more complex than the Ewings of Dallas. Roter Traminer is the same wine as Savagnin Rouge, related to the Gelber Traminer (Savagnin Blanc/Heida) and to Gewürztraminer. Roter Traminer is the predominant Traminer variety in Austria. It has low acidity and literally does smell (and taste) of roses along with dried fruit, marshmallows and citrus notes. In colour it ranges from intensely green to intensely yellow or even a glisten of red. When produced from ripe grapes, it produces wines with pronounced aromas that age well.

Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, Portugal and Italy all grow this grape as do many other countries, but it is particularly well known in Alsace.

We think the best Pinot Blancs in the world might actually be made in Austria. In the last 5 years, possibly even further, my favourite Pinot Blanc every year is Austrian. The variety is grown quite widely, but with particular representation in the areas around the Neusiedlersee, Styria, Vienna, Weinviertel and Kamptal. In Austria, even mid-range Pinot Blancs are stylish, with flavours of almonds and good acidity. The best are concentrated, amazingly complex, and age well in bottle, well in excess of a decade.

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

7 Item(s)

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

7 Item(s)

Pinot Blanc is a mutation of Pinot Gris, itself a mutation of Pinot Noir. On the vine it looks remarkably similar to Chardonnay. It is usually made into dry or sparkling wines but especially in Austria can make some excellent early Trockenbeernauslese. On the nose it can be floral or perfumed with hints of apple and sometimes tropical fruits. The fruit remains on the palate and there is a much longer finish than you might expect from a white wine. Of course the sweeter wines incorporate qualities that you might expect from that style.

I have asked winemakers a few times why they chose "Pinot Blanc" or "Weissburgunder" and whether they were for marketing or cultural reasons. Usually the answer has been "It looked better on the label that way".

Contact Us