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Weinhof Waldschütz - Frühroter Veltliner

Weinhof Waldschütz - Frühroter Veltliner

The Waldschütz family has vineyards in Kamptal and Wagram.

They make lovely and fresh wines, Grüner Veltliner and Riesling, but also rarer varieties, some ample Weissburgunder and very generous reds.

Their focus is on family, tradition and experience. The winery has been in its present state since 1992 and from day one they have committed themselves completely to their wines. There are 16 hectares of vineyards which are their pride and joy. Mostly on sunny slopes they are located in the two well known wine growing areas of Kamptal and Wagram.

Primary rock, sandy loam and gravely loess as well as deep loam-loess soils allow very fruity, noble wines of charming elegance. What earth and nature initiated is carefully finished by them, taking tradition and optimised wine culture in the cellar into consideration.

Anyone who came to our Austrian dinner or to the Austrian tasting could not fail to be impressed by young Ralph Waldschütz. He will be a star one day and you've met him here first!


Frühroter Veltliner is a fruity, powerful wine with a bit of spice and hints of almonds when made into Eiswein, for which it is mostly used as the popularity of dry Frühroter Veltliner has waned in recent years, though still available. Golden straw color. Peach custard, melon and cashew nougat aromas follow through on a round, silky entry to a dryish light-to-medium body with crisp orange note. Finishes with a slightly grassy mineral accented fade. A nice even and balanced apéritif. The early drinking, gently acidic wines are low in alcohol and present a bouquet that is mainly herbaceous with whiffs of flowers and bitter almonds. The varietal Frühroter Veltliner most probably originated in Gumpoldskirchen, Austria. It ripens early and is therefore, in contrast to Zierfandler (late red), called fruehrot (early red). Frühroter Veltliner is a natural cross between Roter Veltliner and Sylvaner and is related to Neuberger, from the same cross, Zierfandler and Savagnin and is used as a parent in a number of crossings. It is not, despite the similar nomenclature, related to Grüner Veltliner.

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