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Weingut Phillips-Eckstein - Plantscher - Riesling

Weingut Phillips-Eckstein - Plantscher - Riesling

Plantscher, also known as Bordeaux Blanc or Gros Bourgogne, is a very rare grape despite having an impressive and much admired offspring in Hungarian Furmint. This has led to the suggestion that it may originate from Hungary rather than France as the synonyms may suggest.

Plantscher is only grown in Switzerland and only grown there in the region of Valais. Not only that, it is only found in one vineyard cultivated by the saviour of so many ultra-rare varieties - Josef-Marie Chanton. Of course his son, Mario, has now succeeded his father at Chanton and continues his legacy with just 0.75 hectares of this ultra-rare grape.

The wines are soft with floral notes, chamomile and honeysuckle They have s moderate acidity as preferred by the Swiss.

According to recent genetic research by Dr. José Vouillamoz, Plantscher has Furmint as a parent and is a grandchild of the prolific Gwäss. The name Plantscher comes from either an older Romanesque dialect word "blâtsyer", or from the French "blanchier" meaning white.

What we call Plantscher is a large grape with whitish berries and a good yield. In order to produce good quality the yield must be very limited. It is described as a more authentic, more resistant Bergler. Rather restrained in youth, broad finish with mineral notes.

Given the relationship with Furmint it is possible that Plantscher originated in Hungary, although we do not know this for certain.

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Riesling wines can be highly aromatic with apple, peach and pear at the forefront, mixed with delicate floral undertones and often honey and spice on the nose. On the palate, Rieslings echo the apple, pear and peach along with citrus and tropical nuances. Rieslings tend to pick up a noticeable "minerality" from their native soils.

Riesling, through DNA data, appears to be a cross between Gouais Blanc and an unknown relative of Savagnin. Riesling seems to have originated on the north bank of the Rhine in Germany where we find its first mention in a document dated 1435.

Up to the early 20th century Riesling and Sylvaner were often confused with each other. If you buy an ancient bottle you can't be sure which it might be. After the 60s, you're OK.

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