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Viognier - Zweigelt

Viognier - Zweigelt

Viognier, like Chardonnay, has the potential to produce full-bodied wines with a lush, soft character. In contrast to Chardonnay, the Viognier variety has more natural aromatics that include notes of peach, pears, violets and minerality. However, these aromatic notes can be easily destroyed by too much exposure to oxygen which makes barrel fermentation a winemaking technique that requires a high level of skill on the part of any winemaker working with this variety.

Although many say Viognier should be drunk young, a good Viognier is nearly always better after a few years. And a quality mature Viognier is a beauty to drink (at least I, Joelle, love the Rhone whites with a bit of maturity!).

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  • Zweigelt Classic Franz / Christine Netzl

    Our reference for Zweigelt - taste the fruit.

    Out of stock

  • Zweigelt Eiswein Weingut Josef Beyer

    Delicious Eiswein made of red grapes. One to cellar.
  • Viognier Domaine de Maison Blanche

    Mature fresh cold climate Viognier
  • Zweigelt Erich Altenriederer

    Only made in good years, smooth spicy Zweigelt
  • Blauer Zweigelt Bisamberg Weingut Christ

    Cherry & spice and all things nice
  • Rubin Carnuntum Franz / Christine Netzl

    A delicious Zweigelt, more complex than the Zweigelt Classic
  • Viognier Grande Réserve Les Romaines Les Freres Dutruy

    Big rich Viognier from the perfect climate of the Geneva region
  • Riedenthal Reserve Weingut Breitenfelder

    Seriously good blend
  • Blauer Zweigelt Weingut Breitenfelder

    One of our coolest Zweigelt

    Out of stock

  • Zweigelt "Fasangarten" Weingut Christian Fischer

    Single vineyard Zweigelt, delicious summer red with minerality

    Out of stock

  • Rubin Carnuntum Markowitsch

    Out of stock

  • Point Cuvée Weingut Nigl

  • Zweigelt Haidacker Franz / Christine Netzl

    Huge complex Zweigelt which will impress.
  • Anna Christina Franz / Christine Netzl

    Always amongst the best reds in Austria.
  • Patronis Stift Klosterneuberg

    Created for the 900th anniversary of the Klosterneuburg Monastery Winery.

    Out of stock

  • Zweigelt Profundo Selektion Karlsberg Hofkellerei des Fürsten von Liechtenstein

    Bold oaked Zweigelt.

    Out of stock

  • Edles Tal Franz / Christine Netzl

    pulls off the elusive combination of power and finesse.
  • Gradenthal Weingut Christian Fischer

    Out of stock

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Viognier can be a difficult grape to grow because it is prone to powdery mildew. It has low and unpredictable yields and should be picked only when fully ripe. When picked too early, the grape fails to develop the full extent of its aromas and tastes. When picked too late, the grape produces wine that is oily and lacks perfume. When fully ripe the grapes have a deep yellow colour and produce wine with a strong perfume and high in alcohol. The grape prefers warmer environments and a long growing season, but can grow in cooler areas as well.

The age of the vine also has an effect on the quality of the wine produced. Viognier vines start to hit their peak after 15–20 years.

The origin of the Viognier grape is unknown; it is presumed to be an ancient grape, possibly originating in Dalmatia (present day Croatia) and then brought to Rhône by the Romans. One legend states that the Roman emperor Probus brought the vine to the region in 281 AD; another has the grape packaged with Syrah on a cargo ship navigating the Rhône river, en route to Beaujolais when it was captured, near the site of present day Condrieu, by a local group of outlaws known as culs de piaux.

The origin of the name Viognier is also obscure. The most common namesake is the French city of Vienne, which was a major Roman outpost. Another legend has it drawing its name from the Roman pronunciation of the via Gehennae, meaning the "Road of the Valley of Hell". Probably this is an allusion to the difficulty of growing the grape.

Viognier was once fairly common. In 1965, the grape was almost extinct when there were only eight acres in Northern Rhône producing just 1,900 litres of wine. The popularity and price of the wine have risen, and the number of plantings has increased. Rhône now has over 740 acres (3.0 km2) planted.

In 2004, DNA profiling conducted at University of California, Davis showed the grape to be closely related to the Piedmont grape Freisa and to be a genetic cousin of Nebbiolo. We also know, through DNA analysis, that Viognier is related to Mondeuse Blanche and is therefore closely related to Syrah.

What to Expect

The wines tend to be a lovely deep ruby colour and the nose is almost physically chewable with lingering black fruits, combining with sweet tones of treacle and caramel and a hint of stewed prunes in the background. Absolutely gorgeous.

On tasting, it is a surprise to find that it is typically lighter in the body than the nose suggested. Flavours of black fruits, especially cherry, come through with hints of plum in the background. Some Zweigelt will give a lot of spice, especially cinnamon. The length of this wine can be astonishing.

Lineage

Zweigelt is named after its creator, Dr Zweigelt, who crossed St. Laurent and Blaufränkisch in 1922 at the research centre in Klosterneuburg. Whilst crossing two great grapes does not guarantee a greater, this comes pretty close. Both parents are used to making beautiful wine and the child is too.

It was originally named Rotburger and in places is still known by that synonym today. However that can be very confusing as there is another grape, totally unrelated, called Rotberger.

Knowing the parentage of Zweigelt, it is clear that it is the grandchild of both Gouais Blanc and Pinot, making it part of serious grape royalty. It is also a parent of Roesler, also created in Klosterneuburg, an up-and-coming red grape in Austria.

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