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St Laurent - Zweigelt

St Laurent - Zweigelt

St. Laurent (in German, Sankt Laurent) is actually named after St. Laurentius’ Day, August 10, which is the day, traditionally, when the grapes begin to change colour. It is mainly found in Austria although it may have originated in Alsace.

The Sankt Laurent sports juicy berries, velvety tannins and it is often quite mouth-filling. Its colour leans towards a deep, dark red. Sankt Laurent wines tend to be fruity and multi-layered and with just a little bit of age can develop an exceptionally smooth texture. However, it is the wine’s bright sour cherry aromas and flavours which are typically offset by subtle tartness.

Sankt Laurent makes a suave and sophisticated wine with a lingering finish that continues to delight for ages. It pairs well with most food, especially meats and as many commentators advise, those foods which you shouldn’t really eat like barbeques, cheese and anything fatty.

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  • St. Laurent Classic Weingut Christian Fischer

    Our reference for St Laurent
  • Grosse Reserve Rot Spaetrshuberot-Gebeshuber

  • Zweigelt Eiswein Weingut Josef Beyer

    Delicious Eiswein made of red grapes. One to cellar.
  • Zweigelt Erich Altenriederer

    Only made in good years, smooth spicy Zweigelt
  • Blauer Zweigelt Bisamberg Weingut Christ

    Cherry & spice and all things nice
  • Rubin Carnuntum Franz / Christine Netzl

    A delicious Zweigelt, more complex than the Zweigelt Classic
  • Point Cuvée Weingut Nigl

  • Perle, Rosé Sekt Franz / Christine Netzl

    A mighty sparkling rosé made from St. Laurent.
  • Zweigelt Haidacker Franz / Christine Netzl

    Huge complex Zweigelt which will impress.
  • Anna Christina Franz / Christine Netzl

    Always amongst the best reds in Austria.
  • Edles Tal Franz / Christine Netzl

    pulls off the elusive combination of power and finesse.

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With its somewhat low yield, the variety is considered difficult in the vineyard and was not always appreciated. It needs good sites with deep soils. It is sensitive during the flowering period and sensitive to late frost. It brings inconsistent yields.

Like many other grape varieties, the facts behind its origins are not easily confirmed. One theory suggests that cuttings were offered by a grape collector called Saint-Laurent du Var while another that it comes from Alsace, where it was known as Schwarzer. Although it shares its name with a number of French villages, there is nothing to suggest that they had anything to do with the naming of this grape. Most likely is the idea mentioned above that it was named after the patron saint of chefs, whose patronal festival coincides with the traditional day on which the berries change colour. It is one of the first grapes planted at the monastery of Klosterneuburg in their experimental vineyard in 1863.

If you are a fan of Zweigelt, remember that in 1922 Fritz Zweigelt combined the Sankt Laurent grape with Blaüfrankisch to create Zweigelt. It is a very good parent indeed.

It is not however closely related to Pinot. Sankt Laurent is not the same as Pinot Saint-Laurent. Although Sankt Laurent is not Pinot Noir, any more than Carménère is Merlot, there are some similarities to be found. If you like a meatier, gamier Pinot Noir, try this – you will not be disappointed!

ophisticated wine with a lingering finish that continues to delight for ages. It pairs well with most food, especially meats and as many commentators advise, those foods which you shouldn’t really eat like barbeques, cheese and anything fatty.

What to Expect

The wines tend to be a lovely deep ruby colour and the nose is almost physically chewable with lingering black fruits, combining with sweet tones of treacle and caramel and a hint of stewed prunes in the background. Absolutely gorgeous.

On tasting, it is a surprise to find that it is typically lighter in the body than the nose suggested. Flavours of black fruits, especially cherry, come through with hints of plum in the background. Some Zweigelt will give a lot of spice, especially cinnamon. The length of this wine can be astonishing.

Lineage

Zweigelt is named after its creator, Dr Zweigelt, who crossed St. Laurent and Blaufränkisch in 1922 at the research centre in Klosterneuburg. Whilst crossing two great grapes does not guarantee a greater, this comes pretty close. Both parents are used to making beautiful wine and the child is too.

It was originally named Rotburger and in places is still known by that synonym today. However that can be very confusing as there is another grape, totally unrelated, called Rotberger.

Knowing the parentage of Zweigelt, it is clear that it is the grandchild of both Gouais Blanc and Pinot, making it part of serious grape royalty. It is also a parent of Roesler, also created in Klosterneuburg, an up-and-coming red grape in Austria.

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