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Eyholzer Roter (Hibou) - Humagne Rouge

Eyholzer Roter (Hibou) - Humagne Rouge

The Eyholzer Roter grape, also known as Hibou, is grown around Visp and in the village of Eyholz just to the west of Visp. It is extraordinarily rare with only 0.25 hectares left worldwide of which the only commercially available wine comes from the vineyards of Josef-Marie Chanton. This ancient variety has in the past, also been grown in Savoie in France and in northern Italy. The traditional method of growing the grape in Valais is to train it on pergolas. This wine is a medium red with a nose of mountain violets and raspberries. Soft and fruity on the palate, it is best served slightly chilled, as one would a young Beaujolais.

DNA testing has been unable to identify the parents of Eyholzer Roter.

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  • Terpsichore Séduction Rouge Domaine des Muses

    A stunning blend of the two main Valais native reds. Worth every penny!
  • Eyholzer Roter Chanton Wein

    A surprising Alpine red, pale, fruity but also surprisingly, err, animal
  • Constellation Giroud Vins

    The first attempt ambitious international blend of Valais Native grapes.
  • Terre Vivante - Assemblage Rouge Gregor Kuonen et Fils

    BIG, big red from Gregor Kuonen.
  • Humagne Rouge Simon Maye et Fils

  • Humagne Rouge Tradition Domaine des Muses

    A wilder version of Humagne Rouge
  • Humagne Rouge, Maître de Chais Provins

    Humagne rouge is both floral and animal
  • Electus Valais Mundi

    A wine created to raise expectations about Swiss wine to a whole new level.
  • Ruistal Varone

    Bold blend from Valais.

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DNA testing recently determined that Humagne Rouge originated in the Val d'Aosta in Italy (just over the St. Bernard pass from Valais) where it was commercially extinct, but has now been replanted under its original name "Cornalin". The original name is used as the botanical name for the grape so Humagne Rouge is (Cornalin). However, the Swiss had reused the "abandoned" name Cornalin in the 1970's as a more marketable name for the grape (Rouge du Pays).

In Switzerland wines called Humagne Rouge and Cornalin are made from different grapes, but a Humagne Rouge from Switzerland and a Cornalin from Italy are made from the same grapes. You may see people distinguish the separate uses of Cornalin as "Cornalin d'Aoste" and "Cornalin du Valais" but the easiest way is to just know whether the wine is from Italy or Switzerland.

Humagne Blanche (Humagne) is, despite the name, unrelated to Humagne Rouge (Cornalin). The grape the Swiss call Cornalin (Rouge du Pays) is one of the parents of Humagne Rouge (Cornalin), the other being unknown and assumed extinct.

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