Back

Persan - Zweigelt

Persan - Zweigelt

This is an unusual variety which can come across as excellent but a little demanding - wild and wonderful reds. Persan is also very difficult to grow and in some years it just won't!

The grape gives wines of deep red colour with a corresponding inkyand dark mulberry fruit, often with a herbal nose and a well structured palate. Dense tannins, dark fruit compote, spicy pepper (depending on the day, I get black pepper, sometimes red and green pepper too) and again herbal notes in the mouth.

The whole production of Persan in Savoie and Isère was 10 hectares in 2013, divided among twenty producers. Nearly all of them are organic. The largest producer of Persan in Savoie has only 0.8 hectares. This is a rare grape indeed.

We have two Persans. One, from our rescuer of grape varieties Philippe Grisard who with his brother was instrumental in the revival of the variety, highlighting the wine's structure, harmonious herbal notes and fruit - a smooth wine (as much as Persan can be smooth, that is!). A second one, from the more natural wine and experimentally minded Raphael Saint Germain allowing the wilder side of the tannins and more exhuberance.

Frankly - try both!

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

8 Item(s)

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

8 Item(s)

What to Expect

The wines tend to be a lovely deep ruby colour and the nose is almost physically chewable with lingering black fruits, combining with sweet tones of treacle and caramel and a hint of stewed prunes in the background. Absolutely gorgeous.

On tasting, it is a surprise to find that it is typically lighter in the body than the nose suggested. Flavours of black fruits, especially cherry, come through with hints of plum in the background. Some Zweigelt will give a lot of spice, especially cinnamon. The length of this wine can be astonishing.

Lineage

Zweigelt is named after its creator, Dr Zweigelt, who crossed St. Laurent and Blaufränkisch in 1922 at the research centre in Klosterneuburg. Whilst crossing two great grapes does not guarantee a greater, this comes pretty close. Both parents are used to making beautiful wine and the child is too.

It was originally named Rotburger and in places is still known by that synonym today. However that can be very confusing as there is another grape, totally unrelated, called Rotberger.

Knowing the parentage of Zweigelt, it is clear that it is the grandchild of both Gouais Blanc and Pinot, making it part of serious grape royalty. It is also a parent of Roesler, also created in Klosterneuburg, an up-and-coming red grape in Austria.

Contact Us