Back

Diolinoir - Zweigelt

Diolinoir - Zweigelt

Diolinoir originates from the Caudoz research centre in Switzerland thanks to André Jaquinet in 1970. Although created as a blending grape to improve the colour of some Swiss wine, as often happens once the vines reach a reasonable age much more can be done with the variety than initially expected. There are now some fantastic examples of Diolinoir on its own. In the Valais this produces a fine and quite powerful wine, usually barrel aged, and it is also increasingly planted in Lavaux and further afield. It is also seeing increased use in some of Switzerland's top-end blends because of its good colour, structure and balance.

Excellent deep colour, good tannins and quite a bit of power. Expect cherry and black fruits, particularly blackberry, a hint of strawberry with some spice and earthiness. In terms of flavour, the variety bears some resemblence to a very concentrated (low yield) Pinot Noir or a cool-climate Sankt Laurent. If you are a fan of crazy mixed-metaphores it is a bit like a Pinot Noir raised by a pack of wild Cabernet Sauvignon.

A Swiss grape born and bred, Diolinoir is a cross between Robin Noir (sometimes known as Rouge de Diolly) and Pinot Noir, taking its name from its parents.

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

11 Item(s)

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

11 Item(s)

What to Expect

The wines tend to be a lovely deep ruby colour and the nose is almost physically chewable with lingering black fruits, combining with sweet tones of treacle and caramel and a hint of stewed prunes in the background. Absolutely gorgeous.

On tasting, it is a surprise to find that it is typically lighter in the body than the nose suggested. Flavours of black fruits, especially cherry, come through with hints of plum in the background. Some Zweigelt will give a lot of spice, especially cinnamon. The length of this wine can be astonishing.

Lineage

Zweigelt is named after its creator, Dr Zweigelt, who crossed St. Laurent and Blaufränkisch in 1922 at the research centre in Klosterneuburg. Whilst crossing two great grapes does not guarantee a greater, this comes pretty close. Both parents are used to making beautiful wine and the child is too.

It was originally named Rotburger and in places is still known by that synonym today. However that can be very confusing as there is another grape, totally unrelated, called Rotberger.

Knowing the parentage of Zweigelt, it is clear that it is the grandchild of both Gouais Blanc and Pinot, making it part of serious grape royalty. It is also a parent of Roesler, also created in Klosterneuburg, an up-and-coming red grape in Austria.

Contact Us