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Jacquère

Jacquère

Drink with Fondue: crisp and clear white wine

In Switzerland we traditionally drink crisp white Chasselas, black tea (no milk), and kirsch with cheese fondue. It needs to be dry and very clean to cut through the cheese.

For variety, we might go for Doral, Heida, or Johannisberg, but much complexity can be lost with all the cheese. I still feel Chasselas is the best as much of its complexity is in the mouthfeel not the nose.

In Savoie they drink Jacquere for the same reason, as well as Altesse.

For people accustomed to more acidity in their white wine, Chasselas can feel "not enough" with Fondue. The Savoie wines will work better for you, or some of the Aosta or Alto Adige wines.

Jacquère originates in Savoie and is grown here almost exclusively with a very few hectares in Portugal. Jacquère is a natural child of Gouais Blanc. Jacquère makes up more than half of all the grape plantings in Savoie.

Jacquere is more generous and produces fresher wines than the other classic white, Altesse, so is often done as a simpler wine, an apéritif, or with rustic dishes. From ours you can expect apple or pear notes, a divine freshness, lovely minerality. A good seafood wine, and, even though most people drink it skiing in the winter, a real Summer treat. Jacquère is usually consumed young, while it still displays its clean minerality and lively citrus palate.

The classic Apellations for Jacquere are Apremont, Abymes and Chignin, but you can find many Blanc de Savoie based on it in other places, such as our lovely Coutaz.

Jacquère has a couple of possible attributions. Jancis Robinson gives the earliest mention as 1868 but some others have suggested that it is mentioned in records during the collapse of Mont Granier in 1248. Whilst the latter has much more historical poignancy, the former has a great deal more authority! Regardless, Jacquère grows in the results of the 1248 collapse among and on massive limestone blocks. It makes up more than half of all the grape plantings in Savoie. A very light pale yellow with aromas and flavours of white flowers, tropical fruits and an underlying flintiness. It often has a slight petillance on the tongue when aged on its lees.

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